Estate Planning

One of the most meaningful ways of giving is by including a gift to the Memorial in your will or estate plan.  A bequest can provide estate tax benefits and is also a way of giving that will never interfere with your current planning or income needs.  Even a small bequest can have large results.  Perhaps in honor of those who landed on the beaches on 6 June 1944, a donor might consider a gift of 6% (or more) of his or her estate.  Six percent will make a significant difference, and other beneficiaries of your estate will know this portion of it is going to create an enduring legacy.  Please talk with the Foundation’s Development Office or your attorney for more information.  A typical bequest in a will might read as follows:

I give, devise, and bequeath to the National D-Day Memorial Foundation, Tax ID# 54-1504679, the sum of $_________ to be used for its general purposes.  The National D-Day Memorial Foundation may be contacted in care of April Cheek-Messier, President, 106 East Main Street, Bedford, Virginia, 24523 (540-586-3329).  To the extent possible, gifts to charitable organizations shall be paid from income in respect of the decedent.

If you find the National D-Day Memorial meaningful and the story it tells important, please consider us in your estate planning. Sustained support of the Foundation guarantees the continued growth and development of future educational programs that emphasize the lessons and legacy of D-Day and World War II. Your support ensures the contributions and sacrifices of the Allied Forces on 6 June 1944 are not forgotten.

For information on how you can include the National D-Day Memorial in your estate planning or on other deferred giving opportunities, please contact the Foundation office by calling 800-351-3329 or 540-586-3329.

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